For example, I am an affiliate for many companies I recommend in my Self-Publishing Boot Camp Guide for Authors in which I recommend Book Design Templates, BookBaby, Scribd, GoDaddy, 48 Hour Books, Book Review Targeter, Legal Zoom, and Grammarly, among others. These companies offer anywhere from 5 percent to a whopping 30 percent of sales. So when you click my link and buy something, I make a little extra money. (Thank you!)
Instead, he focused solely on one platform. When that platform fizzled out, he lost his foundation and his footing as an affiliate marketer. He was unable to reach the people who had once been visiting his website because he was now nowhere to be found. Had he diversified, he wouldn't have gone through the massive pain related to that ranking change.
Do you have zero interest in an expensive mountain bike the company you are an affiliate of sells? Well, you probably don’t want to feature it on your blog, as it is extremely difficult to persuade readers (or anyone for that matter) that they should buy something you wouldn’t be caught spending a single penny on. When you are passionate about a product or–at the very least–interested in learning more about it, this will come through to your readers, engage them and better coax them to buy
I also get much higher click-throughs from links included in my e-news, as opposed to those here on Lectito. Which makes sense. Readers who have joined Lectito‘s mailing list like Lectito enough to give me their email so that I can contact them directly, which implies a higher level of engagement and trust than I’m likely to get from a reader who’s stumbled upon Lectito through Google.
But don't make the mistake of thinking this will be a passive source of income—you're on call whenever you have a guest and you'll always need to keep the place clean for incoming visitors. On top of just renting on Airbnb, consider offering your guests paid add-ons, like Lauren Gheysens', Royal Day Out in London, England—where she gives visitors a local's only tour of the city, complete with bespoke 18th century costumes.

Bruce C. Brown is an award-winning author of more than ten books as well as an active duty Coast Guard officer, where he has served in a variety of assignments for more than 26 years. Bruce is married to Vonda and has three sons: Dalton, Jordan, and Colton. His previous works include: He holds degrees from Charter Oak State College and the University of Phoenix. He currently resides in North Carolina.
Promote products that are stepping stones to products you will create in the future. This is a bit more advanced, but is a great way to think ahead. Amy Porterfield suggests thinking about the first thing your followers will need in order to get started with what you provide. For example, I teach people how to blog, so the first thing they need to start a blog is hosting. That’s why I am an affiliate for hosting.

A browser extension is a plug-in that extends the functionality of a web browser. Some extensions are authored using web technologies such as HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. Most modern web browsers have a whole slew of third-party extensions available for download. In recent years, there has been a constant rise in the number of malicious browser extensions flooding the web. Malicious browser extensions will often appear to be legitimate as they seem to originate from vendor websites and come with glowing customer reviews.[28] In the case of affiliate marketing, these malicious extensions are often used to redirect a user’s browser to send fake clicks to websites that are supposedly part of legitimate affiliate marketing programs. Typically, users are completely unaware this is happening other than their browser performance slowing down. Websites end up paying for fake traffic number, and users are unwitting participants in these ad schemes.
The FTC makes it illegal to use affiliate links without disclosing them. This means that you need to let readers know that purchasing something using your link will benefit you financially. What the FTC cares about is misleading advertising. I checked in with sister BookWorks blogger Helen Sedwick, author of the Self-Publisher's Legal Handbook {affiliate}, who assured me that, "Legally speaking, if you are endorsing a product and you honestly recommend it, then you are not being misleading. To be even safer, you should let readers know you receive an affiliate payment if they purchase products after clicking on your links."
An affiliate marketing program is a lot of work, and in most situations there's a lot of competition so you're not going to be bringing in money immediately. Business owners and entrepreneurs suppose that all you need do is setup a site and choose an affiliate to associate with and then just let it run its course. But according to Three Ladders Marketing, only 0.6% of affiliate marketers surveyed have been in the game since 2013. That means that affiliate marketing takes time and effort to build and make money. 
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